I Want to Believe

(David Huggins lost his virginity to an alien woman – among 100 other extra-terrestrial encounters – and chronicled it all in surreal paintings, few of which have ever been seen. Love & Saucers is his story and it’s available now via VOD.)

As outlandish as an individual’s belief to have been visited by beings from another world may be, it’s often hard to argue against the passion behind that belief. We’re always taught to be respectful of beliefs and ideas different from our own but, let’s be frank, we never know how tightly we hold onto these high morals of ours until they’re put to the test. Documentarian Brad Abrahams has every chance to sensationalize the story of David Huggins, an ordinary man who lived an extraterrestrial life in Love and Saucers. Instead, as any good documentarian should, he allows the subject to speak for itself.

Surrounded by his 100 paintings of alien lifeforms, David Huggins tells his story about love and E.T.s which spans almost seven decades. Huggins explains that these encounters started when he was a child, but when he reached adulthood, he met Crescent, a humanoid alien woman. Huggins, with a smile on his face, says he lost his virginity to her. If this set-up alone has your interest piqued then you’re in for an unexpected ride.

No cynicism. No hidden agenda. Brad Abrahams lets Huggins tell his story with a natural flow. Huggin’s paintings represent the key for the audience to unlock the gate to his otherworldly experiences. With the addition of Huggin’s genuine earnestness, you develop genuine feelings for the man. You may not necessarily believe in what he believes, but you do respect and appreciate how Huggins incorporated this weird and unexplainable phenomenon of his life into positive and reflective artwork.

The second half of the film rolls around and we see the views of Huggins from his neighbors, employer and the people who have also encountered extra-terrestrials. You’ve built a strong connection with Huggins; however, you start to assume the worst once Abrahams introduces these outside and possibly conservative opinions. Much to my surprise, everyone who was interviewed discussed Huggins’ beliefs with respect and admiration especially when it came to his paintings. It’s refreshing to see such open-mindedness from people with a subject matter like alien abduction.

The simplicity of Love and Saucers is its triumph, through and through. The only beat of the film that left me dissatisfied was the final one before the end credits. The reflection of Huggins’ life and the impact it’s had on other people is there, but it’s said in passing with little to no build up to Huggins’ final thoughts. David Huggins’ story is a wonderfully odd story of life and how he gets through it. Brad Abrahams holds this man up like the Olympic torch with his oddity on top of it, blazing eternally.

– Patrick Howard (@PatHoward1972)

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